Berlin Wall

The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a concrete barrier erected by the German Democratic Republic (GDR) (East Germany) that completely encircled the city of West Berlin, separating it from East Germany, including East Berlin. The Wall included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, which circumscribed a wide area (later known as the “death strip”) that contained anti-vehicle trenches, “fakir beds” and other defenses.

The separate and much longer inner German Border (the IGB) demarcated the border between East and West Germany. Both borders came to symbolize the Iron Curtain between Western Europe and the Eastern Bloc.

Prior to the Wall’s erection, 3.5 million East Germans had avoided Eastern Bloc emigration restrictions and escaped into West Germany, many over the border between East and West Berlin. During its existence from 1961 to 1989, the Wall stopped almost all such emigration and separated the GDR from West Berlin for more than a quarter of a century.[1] After its erection, around 5,000 people attempted to escape over the wall, with estimates of the resulting death toll varying between around 100 and 200.

During a revolutionary wave sweeping across the Eastern Bloc, the East German government announced on November 9, 1989, after several weeks of civil unrest, that all GDR citizens could visit West Germany and West Berlin. Crowds of East Germans climbed onto and crossed the wall, joined by West Germans on the other side in a celebratory atmosphere. Over the next few weeks, parts of the wall were chipped away by a euphoric public and by souvenir hunters; industrial equipment was later used to remove almost all of the rest. The fall of the Berlin Wall paved the way for German reunification, which was formally concluded on October 3, 1990.

Wikipedia

I remember November 9th 1989. I cried and cried tears of joy. One of the most abomiinable features of Human Society, A Wall built solely to divide, was being torn down. I was there in spirit with bloody nails ripping at the hateful concrete, with my brothers and sisters.

Lassen Sie Gott mein Richter sein, ich stirbt, um es zu stoppen wieder geschehend.

Ich bin ein Bürger von Berlin auch

Philip

But The Future BECKONS!

The Bamboo Tower

The Bamboo Tower


Does BABEL spring to mind? Lol, But we are not thrown into confusion by our structures. Let us continue to tear down the old ones and REACH FOR THE SKY!
The Burj Dubai

The Burj Dubai

The Internet

Hi Graham, Hi Gill, Hi Inty
Change Your Mind ~ Change The World

Alan Emtage, (born November 27, 1964) conceived and implemented the first version of Archie, a pre-Web internet search engine for locating material in public FTP archives.

  • The author originally wanted to call the program “archives,” but had to shorten it to comply with the Unix world standard of assigning programs and files short, cryptic names such as grep, cat, troff, sed, awk, perl, and so on.

A native of Barbados, and the son of Sir Stephen and Lady Emtage, he attended high school at Harrison College from 1975 to 1983 (and in 1981 becoming the owner of a Sinclair ZX81 with 1K of memory), where he graduated at the top of his class, winning the Barbados Scholarship.

ZX 81

I cycled across London to get 16k of RAM upgrade

In 1983 he entered McGill University in Montreal, Canada studying for an honors Bachelor’s degree in computer science which was followed by a Master’s degree in 1987 from which he graduated in 1991. Emtage was part of the team that brought the first Internet link to eastern Canada (and only the second link in the country) in 1986. In 1989 while a student and working as a systems administrator for the School of Computer Science, Emtage conceived and implemented the original version of the Archie search engine, the world’s first Internet search engine and the start of a line which leads directly to today’s Altavista, Yahoo!, and Google.

45 years old in a couple of weeks.

Some Stats:

  • 105,170,327 active web surfers in the US
  • In Europe 105,096,093
  • Asia 704,213,930 Internet users
  • Latin America and The Caribbean 175,834,439


I make that 2,180,629,578 oh, and I’ve got two computers so 2,180,629,579.


To Get The Ball Rolling……

To Get The Ball Rolling……


C O N I F I G U R A T I O N

Windows 7 Advanced

[blip.tv ?posts_id=2763411&dest=50755]

Exploring the capabilities. It Is a fine operating system. So Fast. visit http://irishbusinesslink.com and please donate. mirror site http://windows7.blip.tv

In Trouble ….Again

I was told to grow up in Twinity by an old member, Helen.

> It Upset Me

>>This Helps

>>>English Translation of Sanskrit Quote:

The Coconut trees,remembering the little amount of water they were fed, when they were saplings, carry loads of coconuts on their top and supply humans with very-tasty and sweet water in abundance, for their life-span.The Wise never forget a help received.

>>>

Our life itself is a blessing. Everyday we receive umpteen, unseen blessings in various forms. An ordinary man feels good when the blessing he gets is good enough to be perceived by him. Most of the blessings go un-thanked, for we do not know whom to thank, for what we received. Even while thanking someone for something our selfish motive will be working behind to see that we do not thank more than we think we got. Most of the favors we receive, we think, are too small to be thanked. This is narrow-mindedness.Indian minds- Sanskrit writers in particular, derived a lesson for life to be learnt from whatever they saw. Nature was their biggest teacher. Trees, flowers, rivers, mountains, clouds, animals and birds are but a few of the lengthy list from whom they saw goodness to learn from. Sometimes the lesson was negative, but most of the times they were positive. It is a great virtue one could learn from Sanskrit writers. Thankfulness is a great virtue. A heartfelt thanks for whatever favors received drags us a bit away from the domain of meanness.Here, in this couplet, the Coconut tree represents a Good man. Man waters fruit and flower-bearing trees for his selfish needs. As they attain maturity, the trees never depend on him for their needs. It is the time for repayment- and that too how??? Compared with what they give us till we are alive and furthermore, the service rendered by man to them seems so trifle. That is why the sanskrit writers call the Coconut trees a ‘Kalpavriksha’ or a ‘Wish-yielding’ tree. Imagine in how many ways the Coconut trees serve us and you will never look at them with the same narrow outlook

>>>

Sanskrit in Asia

>>>> Oh Helen…I run backwards to keep up with you

________________________________

Food For Thought

“I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”

Sir Isaac Newton

I've been on beaches like this!

I've been on beaches like this!